Wanderlust: What it means to me

Although the term of wanderlust has a clear definition, I think all travelers add something personal to this definition: Their source of wanderlust. Because even though it is a term, wanderlust in the end is a feeling. I believe that some of us are born with this feeling, while others develop it as they grow. …I was born with it.

To me, this feeling is all about discovering new ways of living and behaving through travels. By learning new ways, you can namely better your way of living: Adding foreign values and norms to your life, adds insight into your current way of living. As such, I take bits and pieces of foreign cultures and their ways of living and adapt them to my own life. In doing so, I’m gradually finding the way of living that makes me happy and rounds me as a person. Acquiring insight and understanding, therefore, makes a world of difference to me as a person.

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In the end, traveling quite simply fuels me. I believe this is why travelers in general can’t get enough – more wants more. Something in me wants to go – go explore everything I can. Good and bad. You learn from all. I more and more feel that hunger for it, and in periods where it’s not part of my daily life, I am effected emotionally by the lack of it. …There’s a world of adventures out there waiting. If I, therefore, don’t go explore and discover, I feel as if I’m missing out on life. …I want to experience and explore as much as possible in my life. Moreover, I want to share my adventures with friends and strangers with a similar mindset – I want to learn from them. Ultimately, I never want to settle or be limited to one place only. No, as they say: The world is my oyster. So…when I say that I have wanderlust, it means that I have to travel to explore and discover in order to acquire knowledge of and understanding for the world. I will never be content or truly happy if I don’t – this I know for sure! I will continue to travel and settle in different cultures because it simply is in my nature to do so. I soak up as much of this magical world as possible on my adventures so when people ask, ”what’s it like?” I can reply, ”let me tell you…”

xo P!

 

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http://www.world-walk-about.com/northern-asia/the-big-announcement-our-travel-plans/

Traveling: Like falling in love

To me, traveling is exactly like falling in love. Let me elaborate on this: I feel this way for many reasons, however, mainly because you go through all the emotions of a romantic relationship: Excitement, fear, happiness, sadness, frustration, relief, curiosity, desire etc. It’s a state of mind out of your control… You just have to roll with it!

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The longing to explore and discover takes your breath away time after time. You look forward to every moment, every experience it can lead to with an open heart and an open mind. …You can’t get enough. More wants more. Exactly like true love, you always ache to discover more. In return, the feeling you get when discovering something new is nothing less than exhilarating! Actually…it’s addictive – or…it is to me! Because when you’re in love with a person, you not only long for them all the time, however, you also want to know every thing, every detail about them. To me, it’s the exact same emotions that are touched and feelings I get when I travel. Driven by curiosity and excitement, I just want to explore, discover and acquire insight and understanding – and there’s always more to discover. Moreover, it’s the one thing, you’ll sacrifice more or less everything for – it’s about prioritising, right!? And why not prioritise happiness and a positive mind-set at all means?
…Now that I’ve come to think about it, I believe this is exactly why I don’t understand when people don’t like traveling. Why would you not chase happiness!? Of course, like any love, it’s not one without reservation and uncertainty: However, like any true love should be, you trust it – you have your guards open at first but with an open heart and mind. Furthermore, you accept the good and bad. You even reach a point where you appreciate the bad, turn it into good. You fall in love with the differences you can learn from – the ones you grow from. You turn bad into good and thrive on the differences because it inspires you, it motivates you. It motivates you to work harder in pursuing the connection and a better life – the life of a traveler. As a result, you do all that’s in your power to make it work – even if the foreign culture of choice is out of your comfort zone – you adapt and assimilate.
Even if a travel ends up not being for you, you hold memories for a lifetime to treasure. Even if it isn’t for you and the pain is almost unbearable at first, you’re thankful for every experience along the way that has helped shaped you as a person in the process. Even if it’s not for you, truth namely is that you’re a better person because of it.

That’s exactly why traveling is like falling in love to me. What does traveling mean to you?

xo P!

 

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http://danegonzalez.com/wanderlust/

New Beginnings: Settling abroad

Step-by-step, I’m settling here in Amsterdam, Holland. My new room in a shared apartment has been filled with furniture with a little help from IKEA, and all the official paper work has been sorted out. Furthermore, I’ve landed myself one of those 9-17 jobs… One that I’m really excited about as it combines previous work experience with my degrees – it seems like the perfect match. Moreover, my colleagues seems warm and welcoming, which is highly important to me as I’m quite the social type – a friendly and positive work environment is vital to me!

However, although having lived here for a little over a week now, I haven’t had time for what I enjoy the most due to practical matters: Exploring the city.
I guess, I shouldn’t be too worried about that for now as I’m going to live here permanently for an undecided period of time. This means that, if all goes as planned, I’ll have years to get to know the city and all it’s hidden treasures – but it’s not like me… at all! The previous times when I’ve relocated abroad, I was out exploring from day one. Maybe that’s because all the practical matters had been taken care of before moving? Anyway, at least I’ve had time to figure out the most basic things: Where to grocery shop, how public transportation works and where the green areas in my neighbourhood are.

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In this sense, though, I’ve come to wonder: What do I expect of my time in Amsterdam besides having a good time and it to be a positive experience? After some serious thinking, I’ve come to the following conclusion. In the big picture, I’ll work towards 1) Acquiring insight into and understanding for the Dutch culture; 2) Making new friends from all over the world in this highly international city; and 3) Settling in at work, befriending and getting close to my new colleagues. To me, these are the things that truly matter – especially the social aspect of it all.
Besides this, I’ve set myself certain goals to reach within the next five years. No rush, though – I’ll take it as it comes. It’s important for me not to get hung up on achieving certain things – as long as I work towards something with determination and it feels right, I’m on the right track, I’m sure.

xo P!

Moving Day: It’s time for my abroad relocation

Finally! The day has arrived. Moving day… Or moving weekend, really.

Moving day

For so long now, I’ve been looking forward to this day with pure excitement and happiness. Finally, my dream is coming true. With a few bumps along the way, I’m now ready for Amsterdam, Holland, and I cannot wait! Today, I’ll spend the day packing and when I wake up early tomorrow morning, I’ll be well on my way to Amsterdam. …I’ll be well on my way to start my new adventure – my new life.

I’m influenced by rather ambivalent feelings at the moment. I’m both sad and happy: Saying goodbye to everything you know is both terrifying and exciting at the same time. Mostly, though, I’m full of excitement and happiness. I take great comfort in uncertainty. For me, uncertainty, namely, determines certainty. I guess that sounds weird… However, that’s how I am: When nothing is sure, everything is possible – and isn’t that a great feeling!? So why am I sad? I think it’s because I’ll leave my family for good. My family that doesn’t understand my wanderlust or fernweh at all. My wonderful family nonetheless.
For the last couple of months, all my time and energy has been used on things related to this relocation. As such, I haven’t had much energy to use on them, which I feel bad about now. I think I’ve spend the entire week overcompensating for that – now, I think they’re happy to see me leave for a while… Having celebrated the entire month of Christmas resulting in Christmas Evening yesterday with my dear family, though, I feel as if I have said my goodbyes and am ready for this relocation. Of course, I’ll miss them and it will take me a little time to get used to my new reality in the fair city of Amsterdam. However, I’m not one of those people who walks around with an ache in their hearts homesick. Quite on the contrary actually. I rather walk around home being homesick for a place I’ve never been – a place I dearly hope to find one day.

Tomorrow, I’ll arrive in Amsterdam. Tomorrow, I’ll officially begin my new life. Tomorrow, will be the beginning of the rest of my life. …Tomorrow!

xo P!

 

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 Google’s search engine

Being an Expat: Living abroad as a foreigner

Bing an expat

Relocating abroad automatically means that you become categorised as an expatriate – also known as an expat. As such, you have decided to reside in another culture than that of your citizenship – you are now an immigrant. As a result, it’s now your responsibility to adapt to this foreign culture – for better and worse. Don’t be afraid, though, it’s quite the adventure, and as long as you have an open mind, you’ll be more than fine – trust me. However, for anyone relocating to a foreign culture and trying to adapt as well as assimilate to norms and behaviour attached to this culture will know: It takes time. Meanwhile, in my experience, you’ll come to experience things – things that you may or may not have expected before immigrating:

  1. The paper work concerning your relocation abroad is endless
  1. …And the rules and regulations can be rather confusing and, to you, at times, somewhat illogical
  1. Not knowing the foreign language can be a real challenge – even with good English skills
  1. For better and worse, Google Translate becomes one of your treasured friends
  1. You’ll come to find that the importance of a personal number is key to …EVERYTHING
  1. Keeping in touch with friends and family from back home becomes truly important to you
  1. ..As a result, so does all types of social media as they help you stay in touch
  1. You’ll experience that your otherwise common and boring name is exotic and beautiful in the ears of foreigners, which is somewhat wonderfully weird to you
  1. You’ll discover what stereotypes there are out there concerning your home country and its people
  1. You’ll come to understand that there are various and different expectations of personal space
  1. You don’t always know what you should or should not buy at the grocery store
  1. It can be almost impossible (at times, definitely impossible) to find certain native foods
  1. You’ll pay unreasonable amounts of money for food that only somewhat resemble what you can get back home in desperate hours of homesickness
  1. The wonders of goodie bags sent from friends and family with foods from home can make your day
  1. Eating out can be either the best or worst experience
  1. You’ll never really know how much to tip
  1. When you meet a fellow (insert your nationality here), you immediately get excited
  1. However, you’ll experience that meeting new friends from foreign cultures is truly enlightening on so many levels – especially, culture-wise
  1. You’ll find yourself incredible excited when new friends or acquaintances know something about your country – especially, if you, like me, come from a little otherwise insignificant nation that people rarely tend to know much about
  1. You’ll find that keeping up with politics back home is difficult
  1. …So is keeping up with its pop culture
  1. On the other side, you’ll experience that acquiring insight into and understanding for a foreign culture is an exciting and adventurous experience
  1. You’ll come to understand your own culture and foreign cultures more in-depth and acquire perspective on these, realizing that there’s a lot you don’t know about the world yet
  1. Ultimately, you’ll realize that you will never truly know the foreign culture no matter for how long you’ll live there
  1. …That won’t stop you from getting lost in the foreign culture and your new home city/country, which you’ll find nothing but exciting
  1. As a result, you’ll come to treasure your native culture more in some ways and in other ways, you’ll come to treasure the foreign culture more

Despite challenges and difficulties linked to relocating and living abroad, it’s worth it! Every day is the beginning of a new and exciting adventure filled with wonderful people.

xo P!

 

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 Google’s search engine

In the Process: Preparing my next relocation abroad

…Plan, organise, research…
…Then plan a little more, organise a little more and research a little more…

At the moment, I’m in the middle of planning and implementing my next abroad relocation. Within the month, I will (hopefully, if everything works as planned) move permanently to Amsterdam in Holland. I can’t wait! I have been counting down to December for so long now, and it’s finally time… Time to make my dream come true. However, the relocation, of course, comes with a lot of planning. Fortunately, this is something I don’t only enjoy, however, also something I’m quite good at. As a result, I already have all the necessary paper works as well as an apartment. Moreover, I have even started to learn Dutch via Duolingo and scheduled a meeting with the municipality in order to receive a personal number, which is needed for…everything really. Now, I just need a job. As such, I’m currently in contact with various companies in Amsterdam regarding a full-time job within my field of interest.

Job search
As it will be my first non-student job, I am excited to see what exactly I’ll end up doing and in which field. Of course, I’m applying for certain jobs connected to my experience and education. Nevertheless, there are many opportunities out there. Hence, as much as this is an interesting and exciting process, it is also a scary one. It is scary due to the uncertainty linked to it – simply because I have no control over the situation. I mean, of course, I send out applications and make sure to continually improve not only my CV but also my cover letter, which has shown highly positive responses. But… In the end, you never quite know whether or not the companies in question find you an attractive candidate for the job or that you lack experience and/or certain qualifications. Hence, I can do nothing more now but wait… Wait for feed back and a yes or no reply to my application… …Let’s just say, I’m not the patient kind, and to not have control over my situation is rather annoying… Nonetheless, this is my current situation. And when nothing is sure, everything is possible – let’s stay positive and optimistic, shall we.

xo P!

 

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 Google’s search engine

Down the Rabbit Hole: Future relocation abroad plans

As an aspiring traveler always on the move, I have certain countries in mind in which I would not only love to travel to, however, also live in. Let’s just say: I’m not planning on returning to Denmark once I move abroad again next month. Ever… No, I want to settle in one country at a time for a longer period of time. That’s the plan. Truth is, Denmark has never felt like home to me, and I’m quite certain my home is out there somewhere. Maybe the best way to explain it is through the concept of fernweh? …I suffer from fernweh: What fernweh means is, basically, that you’re homesick for a place you’ve never been. As such, I’m sure that I’m destined to lived abroad somewhere. I just need to find the country I belong to first. Until then, I’ll travel and settle in various countries for a longer period of time. …Of course, you never know what the future holds, and I might end up falling in love with the next country, I move to. If that’s the case, then I know I’ve found my home and then I’ll be content with traveling the world and living permanently in that country. So when I write ”future relocation abroad plans,” they’re just plans – not set in stone. As a quite ambitious and determined young woman, I also want a career. Hence, my career comes first. Hopefully, however, there’s room for both a career and traveling. Anyway, for now, I have four future relocation abroad plans: Amsterdam, New York, Edinburgh and Stockholm.

Holding the world in my heands

Amsterdam, Holland
First and foremost, there is Amsterdam in Holland. I’m moving there next month and I can’t wait. I already have a furnished apartment with two roomies waiting for me while I’m currently looking for a job.
Recently, one of my friends asked me why my heart is set on Amsterdam. The only way I can explain it is that I’m drawn to it. My intuition tells me this city is the next stop. It, simply, has to be Amsterdam. …When I imagine my future life in Amsterdam, it puts a smile on my face. It makes me happy. This feeling isn’t new to me: When I relocated to London, Dublin and Berlin, I had the same feeling. Although these adventures were part of my education and, therefore, not permanent, it can’t quite be compared to moving to Amsterdam this time. However, as these adventures turned out nothing but amazing, I am not one to question my intuition. I follow it. Whole-heartedly. Hopefully, this adventure will turn out just as amazing as the previous relocations abroad have.

New York, USA
For some reason, I just have to live in America for a period of time. I wish to experience first hand the differences between the American and European cultures – lifestyles and line of thoughts. For some reason, this is very intriguing to me. Obviously, NY represents only one part of the US, I am aware of that. Nevertheless, New York, NY, is where I’ve set my heart.
The reason why I have my heart set on New York in America is due to its reputation as a young and dynamic city. …The city that never sleeps. Furthermore, it doesn’t seem to be restricted to a certain generation or age group which means that when I’ve explored Amsterdam and Holland to its fullest for 5-10 years, I’m not old enough to relocate to New York. And this city characterised as colourful and adventurous in the land of opportunity, I will fit right in – for a period of time at least.

Edinburgh, Scotland
Then, once I’m tired of the fast-paced city life, I plan to move to Edinburgh in Scotland. Green, fresh and beautiful Scotland.
When a dear friend and I visited the city back in 2013, I completely fell for its charm – the culture, history and people. As such, it’s a culture I want to explore further – and just just for a vacation, no I wish to settle there for a longer period of time. And with the opportunity for weekend tours around Scotland and to the Lake District in north England as well as the rest of UK and Ireland, I’m certain that my 40s here will be well spent and bring me calmness along with a more mature and grown-up version of me.

Stockholm, Sweden
Finally, I plan to grow old in Stockholm in Sweden.
I fell in love with the city when I visited Sweden earlier this year. This beautiful capital with stunning architecture, harbour views and scenery captured my heart immediately. As such, it is a city in which I can very well imagine myself grow old with a future husband because it’s lively, however, not too lively – it’s the perfect combination of adventurous and calm.

So… Those are my current future relocation abroad plans. Do you have any? Where would you like to settle for a period of time – or permanently?

xo P!

 

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Google's search engine

Why Travel: Why not!?

I’m not saying, I’ve traveled much because taking the number of the world’s countries into perspective, I really haven’t. However, I’ve traveled parts of Europe – I’ve even lived in various foreign countries. Furthermore, I plan to travel the world – bit by bit – and settle in various other countries.

Travel

I count myself lucky to have been given or developed an interest in and curiosity about foreign countries: An interest in acquiring insight into and understanding for foreign cultures and their ways of living – for people different from me, not just culture-wise. My eager in getting to know foreign norms and ways of living has changed my life in more than one way and it continues to do so. In this sense, some people don’t understand my interest, curiosity and eager for foreign cultures – for traveling… …definitely not for wanting to settle in foreign countries. In return, I don’t understand them either. I mean, why not travel!? Travel gives you insight and understanding – perspective. It enlighten and educates you.

If we live only in our own little worlds – not exploring difference, we become ignorant and unable to put ourselves in the shoes of other people – and other people from foreign cultures, their norms and lifestyles. However, if we expand our little worlds to include the worlds of other people – especially people from foreign cultures, we challenge ourselves and gain perspective. Furthermore, we get to explore and experience things we only thought existed in our imagination and we get to meet new people with various and different takes on life from all over the world. As a result, we expand our social and (interultural) communication skills as well as grow and develop as human beings. Hence, I’m not sure why some people need reasons why to travel – it’s probably part of that side of it that I just don’t understand. …I can’t wrap my mind around it. Especially, because I can’t find enough reasons why not to travel!?

xo P!

 

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Google's search engine

Intern Abroad: My 10 reasons why to intern abroad

It’s no secret that I’m fascinated by interculturalism and cross-cultural communication. I have not only among others studied it at university, however, I’ve also made sure to practice it in real life by relocating to foreign cultures. One of my abroad stays that has made a tremendous impression on me was my internship in Dublin, Ireland. Of course, any relocation abroad makes a lasting impression on you, however, working in an intercultural environment abroad is quite a unique experience. As such, this blog post concerns a reflection on my own experience and presents you with 10 reasons why to intern abroad.

1) Explore a Foreign Country and its Culture
By interning abroad, not only will you have the opportunity to explore a new country and its culture, no you’ll do it from the inside – so to speak. By working with locals (maybe even in an intercultural setting), you have the opportunity to dig deep and immerse yourself in a new culture on a much deeper level than other types of abroad programmes offer. If the work place, furthermore, is intercultural, you have the possibility to discuss the culture’s norms and believes from an international angle. As such, working as an intern abroad not only provides you with an understanding for a foreign country and its culture, however, also its work environment(s) and the social norms linked to this.

2) Develop Global Perspective and Understanding
When you live in a foreign country, you automatically acquire insight into its culture from various perspectives. As a result, you gain a broader view of current (international) events and/or situations as well as your field of study and the concept of a work environment – both professionally and personally. This insight leads to understanding, which gives you perspective. This will most likely help you to view future challenges (and opportunities) differently and solve problems from a different aspect than what you’re used to.

3) Improve Language Skills
If you move to a foreign country, you’ll have the opportunity to improve your language skills and become more confident in speaking the foreign language in question. Furthermore, if you’ll be working at an intercultural work place, you’ll also have the possibility to learn other foreign languages that your colleagues speak. And let’s face it: Living in an increasingly international and intercultural world, the ability to speak multiple languages will make you more marketable to future employers.

4) Theoretical vs. Practical Knowledge
An internship abroad is the all time opportunity to gain some practical insight, understanding and experience in theories linked to your studies. In other words, you’ll have the possibility to use the skills you’ve been taught in the classroom in a real-world setting. As such, it’s a chance to prove the worth of your qualifications, turn theory into practice and show your employee as well as yourself that you can perform in the role you’ve been given and the future role you strive for.

5) Try Out a Possible Career
Like me, you might have various and different ideas of a future career. Hence, an internship presents you with the perfect opportunity to try out a possible career. Moreover, as internships are generally short-term, they allow you to test a career (or an industry) without committing to it.

6) Valuable Work Experience
Even if you eventually choose not to pursue the career you test in your internship, an internship will add valuable work experience to your CV. Upon graduation, hands on experience within your field of studies will no doubt give you a head start, as you’ll have practical and not just theoretical experience within your field.

7) Networking Opportunity
What better way to meet people within your field of studies than through an internship!? Even if you have relevant work experience, knowing people in the industry never hurts when chasing a career. Therefore, an internship might give you relevant contacts within the industry you’re trying to break into and end up helping you get a job after graduation. If not, references from people in the industry will definitely add weight to your application.

8) Transition into a Job
Some companies perceive interns as prospective employees. As a result, if you do a good job during your internship and leave with a good impression, your intern company might be interested in hiring you full time after graduation because you’ve already proven your worth and know the company.

9) Personal Growth and Development
By now, there’s no doubt that an internship will gain professional value. However, an internship will definitely also gain personal value. Because, during the months you intern, you learn much about yourself as a student, co-worker and, ultimately, person – not to forget…

10) An Experience You’ll Never Forget
Living abroad is an experience you’ll never forget – for good and bad. You don’t only grow and develop as a person, gain cultural insight and understanding, get to travel around the country and meet new friends, no you also have a lot of different experiences linked to various aspects of your new life abroad. …Yes, it’s not just good for your CV.

So… What are you waiting for? There are so many good things to gain from an internship abroad. …Maybe you’ve already undertaken an internship abroad? So you may agree with my ten reasons why to go abroad to intern? Maybe you have other good reasons to do it? Please, feel free to share.

xo P!

Christmas Party, Dublin

The End of an Era: Excitement for what’s to come

Today, it’s my birthday. Another year has gone by …so quickly. I can’t believe that it’s already my birthday again… And that I turn 26 years old. Instead of panicking over getting closer and closer to my 30s not having anything specific planned for my future, I choose to take my birthday as an opportunity to step back and sort of reflect upon my life. Because, this year, my birthday is special. This year, my birthday is a game changer.
In many ways, 2015 has been the end of an era, and my birthday just underlines this fact. Soon I’m relocating to Amsterdam, Holland, where an entire new life awaits me as a grown-up (ish) graduate with work and lots of responsibility. Although the concept of responsibility scares me, it also excites me. Finally, I’ll be left all to myself – for good and bad – and I’m ready. …I’ve been ready for a long time now.

After having graduated from university this summer, I’ve been thinking a lot about where I am and where I’d like to go. As you can read from the last months’ blog posts, I’ve been doing a lot of reflection and come to the conclusion that all I do know is that I want to spend my life traveling and meeting wonderful people. Everything in between is sort of a bonus, as I know that traveling and having wonderful people in my life will automatically make me happy. The fact that I have no strings attached being single and all means I can pretty much do as I please, which is an amazing feeling. I don’t have to consider anybody or anything in the process – except for a relatively good salary for my next job. This makes my life as an aspiring traveler so much easier.

All through my life, I’ve set myself certain goals to reach and worked hard to accomplish these – well-knowing that everything comes at a certain time and pace, and that you can’t really rush things …although, being quite impatient by nature, I wish I could sometimes! These personal goals come to me as inspiration every now and again. Without any hesitation, I follow them to make sure, I not only follow my intuition, however, also my ambition in life. Because, truth is, I am quite ambitious, and I work hard to never let myself down. So far that’s worked out very well. In this sense, being the type of person who plan, organise and schedule all the big things in my life down to the littlest detail, I’m always right on track – especially, because I leave room for obstacles along the way. That’s just how I like it – always prepared, with a back-up plan. As I, now, start a new era in my life, I’m aware that this might not be possible to the same extent in the future, as moving permanently abroad to a country whose (among others) welfare isn’t the same as here in Denmark and things, as a result, are a bit more risky than what I’m used to. However, this fact will undoubtedly only make me work harder – setting and striving for goals while keeping busy living an active life, chasing my ambition…and continuing happiness. Hence… Even with no specific plans for the future, I’m excited for what’s to come. Because, when nothing is sure, everything is possible.

xo P!

Pernnille Oberg....